the m88 is a bit more versatile in my opinion, gets used on guitar, toms once in a while, snare, vocals it sorta like a bigger soudning SM57 or M201. Personally I do not like dynamics on kick drum at all , as it do not sounds as the drum , dark muddy , messy tone. The RE27 is a bit more colored overall. If you don’t care, and would rather just skip to the stuff about how the mic sounded, click here:)]Yes, Also have on hand the RE-20 but use the 421 more for kick than the re-20. E Between the two of us we've got just about all of the "usual suspects" when it comes to kick drum mics. RE20 is a different animal with a nice roll off feature and is primarily intended as a v/o mic although it shines in other applications as well. The U47fet became one of my favorite voice-over mics as well, much smoother and fuller than the U-87. the m88 is a bit more versatile in my opinion, gets used on guitar, toms once in a while, snare, vocals it sorta like a bigger soudning SM57 or M201. I tried this position with the RE20 and it sounded terrible. The RE27 has an improved frequency response. (By comparison, the HPF on most studio condensers operates at a lower range but more aggressively, -3 to -6dB/octave below 75-150Hz.). Fitting bass guitar tracks together with kick drums recorded with D112, Beta52, e602, D6 always requires some extreme eqing of the Bass guitar. They are also great on toms, I got 2 of them for a $100 no complaints. The vocal group was either 5 or 7 singers depending on arrangement and they'd gather around the microphones (girls on one side, guys on the other) and they'd do 3 or so stacks of vocals. and I would never question the greatness of the tool known as the RE20. FWIW, I like both SM7s and M88s better than RE20 on kick, and they're both current production. The RE20 is an industry-standard large-diaphragm dynamic microphone, used worldwide on applications ranging from broadcast/VO to kick drum. I cringe every time I read that someone is using a U-47fet on kick! I killed an RE20 with a kick drum once. I've shot about everything out for inside kick and the RE20 is the clear winner. I went back to 421 and actually like it better......haven't killed one of those yet. RE20 by Electrovoice - is there a better bass drum mic than this currently made? Cardioid [Ken explains – in probably a few more paragraphs than necessary – the answer to the above question. For those of you who uses the RE20 or RE27 on kick drum, what distance from the front head to you position it? Just not inside the kick drum (at least in my experience). Combine that with a mic that you like for inside kick, from what you mentioned RE20 would do just fine, and you'll have a nice picture of the … It uses Electro-Voice’s patented Variable D design to control the microphone’s proximity effect. For pop/rock/what have you, it just does not have the bite or punch to cut through a mix without heavy processing. Pattern control is so consistent that the frequency response is nearly independent of angular location of the sound source, creating virtually no off-axis coloration, yet providing greatest possible rejection of unwanted sounds. D6 was just too scooped and too 'modern' for me. Here comes the inevitable "It all depends." I use the RE20 more though but usually on very specific things like..kick and bass cab. If you have a great analog EQ (Harrison EQ32) and want a bass drum mic that is tight and focused in the bottom end and will give you the chance to sculpt what you want the bass drum to sound like, I don't think there is anything better currently made. I was doing a session last year at a client's home studio, and he had a newer EV PL20, which came several years after the RE; and while I thought it sounded good, I didn't think that it had the same "vibe" as the RE does. If the RE20 doesn't sound good, bring in someone who knows how to tune a drum. Gretsch 24 x 16 1980's maple....super punchy..big w/ just the right amount of attack. The RE27 may do better for you on kick drums and bass cabs, but less so on vocals. And of course there is a huge amount of bad suckin kick drums around. Usually end up placing it so that the point where the grill of the mic meets the body is at the plane of the drum head. I just think that if you have a good EQ and a good well tuned drum that the RE20 is the absolute best Starting point. U47FET maybe as FOK, but not often. The re20 is an incredibly accurate and soft spoken kick drum mic that is absolutely perfect when you're going for that "pillow hitting a lampshade" sound. The RE20 is a very flat response microphone, very directional and it has very good sounding off-axis response. The other large … I cringe every time I read that someone is using a U-47fet on kick! I find that when I use the RE20, I can eq the Kick a little to bring out some attack but the bass guitar sits with the kick drum without much eq tweaking to the Bass guitar track(s). For pop/rock/what have you, it just does not have the bite or punch to cut through a mix without heavy processing. The RE27 may be more forgiving. Re20 and D6 just were not my cup of tea although they can work. The OP has it nailed. RE20 is not a favorite of mine for kick, like one said if you want that old funk sound go for it. Been using that one for a while. Just a friendly reminder that political discussion, (including "offhand" and 'sideways' commenting) is. Unlike the newer broadcast dynamics, the RE27N/D and RE320, the RE20 does use an output transformer. D112 is kinda a one trick pony, at least for me. Besides kick drum, I've used it on guitar amps, bass amps, horn sections, and even on vocals from time to time, all with very pleasing results. I use an RE20 inside and put the 147 outside and blend.........I like it. i DO like a d112 on kick - i tend to roll off the top and let the room mics (R84s) provide most of the attack......for me the RE20 is just a little lean (nice 70s FM pop kinda sound but not what i am usually after) and certainly to my ears a 421 on kick is just a bit of a pussy!......i keep things very simple though: only one mic outside kick - tune it to perfection and then processing can be kept to a minimum......but that's just me. It was a glorious sound. Just like the D112 the re20 can use a little eq to get more or less of what one needs. The mic is also excellent for kick drum or acoustic guitar recording. So many options. Big fan of my PR40 as well. A switch on the mic body provides a high-pass filter, aka a “bass tilt-down switch,” which drops the low-frequency response by approximately 2.25dB/octave below 400Hz. Beta 52 is killer on kick drum. Another vote for the 868. The RE20 is an industry-standard large-diaphragm dynamic microphone, used worldwide on applications ranging from broadcast/VO to kick drum. Here is my review of the EV RE20 mic. I use the RE20 more though but usually on very specific things like..kick and bass cab. A true cardioid microphone, the RE20 offers greatest rejection at 180° off axis — directly to the rear of the microphone. I'm a big fan of my re20. So I just finished testing out the Electro-Voice RE20 Dynamic Microphone, another fabulous vocal mic that I've been wanting to get my hands on for a long time. the 320 is voiced and has a filter to accomodate modern kick drum sounds. I took my RE-20 to the local GC a while back to compare … The D12 versus RE20 sound can be described thus: Poof versus Kunk. Whatever works for you. Did we get anything wrong on this page? The re20 is an incredibly accurate and soft spoken kick drum mic that is absolutely perfect when you're going for that "pillow hitting a lampshade" sound. I think My favorite is the Beyer M88 but getting this guy in the, Even though it is not in production the best kick drum mic is the Neuman U47FET. The PL series was simply a rebranding of selected RE-series models. Placeed 1/2 way in the shell, aimed up at the beater point, you almost immediately have a final kick drum sound with a touch of 1176 or 2500 compression. Pictures Of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits In The Studio, AKG d112 or Shure beta 52a for live kick drum. I actually think the M88 is a bit clearer sounding and less directional than the re20. It uses Electro-Voice’s patented Variable D design to control the microphone’s proximity effect. Kurt Foster, Mar 17, 2015 #7. moonbaby Mmmmmm Well-Known Member. Lately we have been sticking an RE20 in front of the hole of the … The Electro-Voice RE20 and Electro-Voice PL-20 microphones are identical. So that's sort of a spoiler about what I think of this fabulous :-). I think many would argue that there are several mics that generally work better than the RE20, but with everything, it does depend on what YOU want to hear.

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